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Point King (King Point)

Admiralty Reference # 1802
1858 - present

 

 

 

 

 

1858 - 1911

 191? 1980's 

1980s  - Present

 

The Point King light which marked the harbour entrance, was first lit on 1 January 1958 (the third lighthouse in WA after Rottnest and Arthur Head in 1851)

 

The first light was a prefabricated wooden tower 4 ft square containing a second order dioptric light which was shipped from Wales. The wooden tower was set into the Keeper's Cottage at the end of the passageway. The tower was 17 ft high and the light was visible for about 18 miles.

 

This light was replaced with a fifth order light in 1901.

 

in 1912, this light was replaced with an AGA occulting lantern on a 30ft skeleton steel tower positioned in front of the keepers cottage.

 

In the 1980's this was replaced by a tubular column

 

The Point King Lighthouse and the Breaksea Point Lighthouse were planned and built at the same time by convict labour under the direction of Capt Wray of the Royal Engineers Regiment. He in turn selected Sgt Joseph Nelson as the principal engineer. Nelson's main job was to supervise the convicts building Beaksea light while local contractors led by Mr Moir established the Point King Lighthouse.

 

the Breaksea Light construction was delayed a little and did not shine until late February 1958.

The ruins of the Point King Lighthouse and keepers cottage are still nestled on the rocks below the 8 km walk trail which now joins Oyster Harbour and Princess Royal Harbour'

 

came into being as a result of the end of the Crimean War with the likelihood of the return of the lucrative mail boat service to the eastern States. The British Government offered to erect two lighthouses if the local Government would undertake the running cost. The offer was accepted and in May 1857 an engineer and party of convicts arrived from Perth to erect the prefabricated lights sent from England.

 

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References

Cumming et al: Lighthouses on the Western Australian coast and off-shore islands, 1995

Austin, Stan; Lighthouses of Albany; Publ: WA Museum Albany, 2004

Greenslade, F.N.; Unveiling of Memorial Plaque speech; January 10 1998.

Register of the National Estate - as of 22 June, 1993.